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Daily Devotionals from Grace in the Workplace
Wednesday, May 27 2015

Verse of the Day

When anyone is guilty in any of these ways, he must confess in what way he has sinned and, as a penalty for the sin he has committed, he must bring to the Lord a female lamb or goat from the flock as a sin offering; and the priest shall make atonement for him for his sin. If he cannot afford a lamb, he is to bring two doves or two young pigeons to the Lord as a penalty for his sin – one for a sin offering and the other for a burnt offering. … If, however, he cannot afford two doves or two young pigeons, he is to bring as an offering for his sin a tenth of an ephah of fine flour for a sin offering. [Leviticus 5:5-7, 11 – NIV 1984]

The concept of fairness is getting a lot of press nowadays. When we were growing up, we learned the ways of the world and the worldly concept of what is fair (and conversely, what’s not) was ingrained in our psyches. But what is fair from a secular perspective and what is fair in God’s eyes are often diametrically opposed to one another. When those of the secular world look at God’s Word, they are often shocked by many of the things that God considers to be just and right. We as Believers have to “unlearn” much of what we were taught over the years as we study God’s ways. Humans are fixated on fairness, while God is the epitome of truth and justice. He is everything that is just, right, true, and holy. In the end, God’s justice prevails because it focuses on and reflects His majesty and glory. It really is all about Him!

Today’s passage from Leviticus is interesting because conceptually it is one of the few in the Bible with which the secular world could agree. The situation involves certain types of sin offerings where a person does not respond when he/she is a witness and could give testimony, touches something ceremonially unclean, touches human uncleanliness, or takes an oath carelessly. This is the only offering which takes into account the offender’s ability to “pay” and makes adjustments accordingly. There is no such reprieve based on circumstances and ability for the other offerings.

Contrast this with the parable of the workers in the vineyard (Matthew 20:1-16), which is perhaps one of the most unfair results in the Bible from a human perspective. In this parable, Jesus describes a landowner who hires workers for his vineyard throughout the day—beginning at dawn and again at 9 a.m., at noon, at 3 p.m., and finally at 5 p.m. When it came time to settle up with the workers, the landowner pays the ones he hired at 5 p.m. the same amount he’d agreed to pay the ones that he’d hired at dawn. In fact he paid all the workers the exact same amount without taking into account the fact that many had worked less than the others. Those that started earlier in the day were appalled that those that started much later (3 p.m. and 5 p.m.) got paid the same as they did. When they complained, the landowner said, “Friend, I’m doing you no wrong. Didn’t you agree with me on a denarius? Take what is yours and go. Don’t I have the right to do what I want with my business? Are you jealous because I’m generous?” (Matthew 20:13-15.) The point Jesus is making is that the length of time which a Believer knows and believes in Him has no bearing on his salvation. The parable stands for the proposition that a concern about rewards based on merit, as opposed to the grace of God, has no place in His Kingdom.

“So the last will be first, and the first will be last.” (Matthew 20:16)

Posted by: John AT 07:30 am   |  Permalink   |  Email

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